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Explore the largest database of poetry and analysis on the internet, with 4,323 poems.

Explore the Greatest Poets

We have poems analyzed from the greatest poets ever. Discover poems from 993 poets.

Learn Every Literary Term Like Never Before

We have the largest database of literary terms explained, embedded in all our analyses, to help you understand poetry. Explore the glossary with 860 terms defined.

Masculine Ending

A masculine ending, a common term used in prosody, occurs when a metered verse line ends with a stressed syllable.

Speak of the devil

“Speak of the devil” is used to acknowledge that someone who was the subject of discussion has come into the room.

Ekphrastic

Ekphrastic is a type of poem that explores art. The poet engages with any type of visual art within their writing.

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy

“There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy” is an enigmatic quote that appears in the first Act of Hamlet. It is spoken by the title character: Hamlet.

Synesis

Synesis is a rhetorical device that occurs when the writer structures a sentence based on its “sense” rather than its grammatical structure.

Life Writing 

Life writing is a term used to define a variety of genres focused on recording personal memories and experiences. It includes biographies, diaries, letters, personal essays, memoirs, and more.

Let sleeping dogs lie

“Let sleeping dogs lie” is a reminder not to bring unnecessary risk or danger upon oneself.

Verse Paragraph

A verse paragraph is a section of poetry that resembles a prose paragraph, that which is found in novel writing and short stories.

Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once

“Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once” is a quote used in William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, in Act II, Scene 2.

Lampoon

A lampoon is a type of satire in which a person or thing is attacked unjustly. They can be found in prose and verse.

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Famous Poems Worth Reading

Not sure where to start? See our pick of some of the best poems ever created.