Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson is one of best-loved American poets of all time. She is remembered for her hundreds of short poems, mostly written in ballad verse. Her poems touch on topics like love, fame, nature, and most commonly, death. She was a recluse throughout her life and it was only after her death that her poetry became widely known. Read more about Emily Dickinson.

Some of Dickinson’s most famous poems include Because I could not stop for DeathHope is the thing with Feathers, Wild Nights! – Wild Nights!, I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, and I heard a Fly buzz – when I died.

I Cannot Live With You

‘I cannot live with You’ by Emily Dickinson is a poem about marriage. The speaker spends the lines declaring why she can’t “live with you” and her various related concerns.

I cautious, scanned my little life

‘I cautious, scanned my little life’ by Emily Dickinson is a clever, metaphorical poem that addresses change and one’s legacy. The poet struggles to understand her changed attitude towards her literary accomplishments after a period of time has elapsed. 

I cautious, scanned my little life

I could bring You Jewels—had I a mind to

‘I could bring You Jewels—had I a mind’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem about friendship. The speaker contemplates what gift she could possibly get a friend she dearly loves.

I did not reach Thee

‘I did not reach Thee’ by Emily Dickinson is a complex poem about a speaker’s journey through life. She expresses both optimism and hesitation in the face of her death and attempts to reach God. 

I did not reach Thee

I dreaded that first Robin

’I dreaded that first Robin’ by Emily Dickinson is a surprising poem about nature. The speaker confesses to an unusual opinion about the season throughout the lines.

I dwell in Possibility

‘I dwell in Possibility’ by Emily Dickinson is a short, memorable poem. It explores themes of writing, specifically poetic writing, and the power it has.

I felt a Funeral, in my Brain

‘I felt a Funeral, in my Brain’ by Emily Dickinson is a popular poem. In it, she depicts a very unusual idea of life after death.

I Gave Myself To Him

‘I Gave Myself To Him’ by Emily Dickinson is a clever love poem. It gives the readers a glimpse of the intensity of a relationship between the speaker and her subject.

I have a Bird in spring

‘I have a Bird in spring’ by Emily Dickinson is dedicated to a close friendship poet was concerned about losing. It uses an extended metaphor created through zoomorphism. 

I have a Bird in spring

I have never seen “Volcanoes”

‘I have never seen “Volcanoes”’ by Emily Dickinson is a clever, complex poem that compares humans and their emotions to a volcano’s eruptive power. 

I have never seen “Volcanoes”

I heard a Fly buzz – when I died

‘I heard a Fly Buzz – when I died’ by Emily Dickinson is an unforgettable depiction of the moments before death. The speaker emphasizes the stillness of the room and the movements of a single fly.

I like a look of Agony

‘I like a look of Agony’ by Emily Dickinson expresses a speaker’s perception of pain. She sees it and knows that it’s real. This is something she takes comfort in. 

I like a look of Agony

I like to see it lap the Miles

‘I like to see it lap the Miles’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem. It explores themes of industrialization, power, and human ingenuity.

I measure every Grief I meet

‘I measure every Grief I meet’ by Emily Dickinson is a dark and depressing poem. The poet explores the nature of grief and how loss is unavoidable.

I saw no Way – The Heavens were stitched

‘I saw no Way – The Heavens were stitched’ by Emily Dickinson depicts heaven and the afterlife. The poet thoughtfully explores how she feels about the breadth of the universe.

I Started Early – Took my Dog

‘I Started Early – Took my Dog’ by Emily Dickinson personifies the sea. Dickinson depicts it as a lover and alludes to her speaker’s fears in regard to sex and love.

I Taste a Liquor Never Brewed

‘I tasted a liquor never brewed’ by Emily Dickinson celebrates life. The poet uses natural imagery, such as that of berries, and pearls, to depict it.

I Years had been from Home

‘I Years had been from Home’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem that speaks to one’s perceptions and fears of change. 

I Years had been from Home

I’m “wife” – I’ve finished that

‘I’m “wife” – I’ve finished that’ by Emily Dickinson explores independence and womanhood. The poet depicts an unmarried woman and contrasts her with a wife.

If Ever the Lid Gets off my Head

‘If Ever the Lid gets off my head’ by Emily Dickinson is a thought-provoking poem. In it, the poet makes a distinction between her mind and common sense.

If I can stop one heart from breaking

‘If I can stop one heart from breaking’ by Emily Dickinson is a selfless proclamation of one’s desire to help. The poet’s speaker offers help in a variety of ways in some cases to better her own life.

If those I loved were lost

‘If those I loved were lost’ by Emily Dickinson is a complex poem. It uses allusions to describe how the poet, or at least her speaker, would react to the loss of loved ones.

If you were coming in the Fall

‘If you were coming in the Fall’ by Emily Dickinson is a meaningful poem about true love and a speaker’s willingness to wait for her lover to return.

If you were coming in the Fall

In The Garden

‘In the Garden’ by Emily Dickinson skillfully depicts nature. The poet focuses in on a garden and the bugs and birds one might see there.

It sifts from Leaden Sieves

‘It sifts from Leaden Sieves’ by Emily Dickinson is a beautiful nature poem. The poet explores the way that a fresh snowfall can reframe the whole world.

It was not Death, for I stood up

‘It was not Death, for I stood up’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem about understanding depression. Specifically, the speaker is interested in understanding herself.

Jesus! thy Crucifix

‘Jesus! thy Crucifix’ by Emily Dickinson is a short poem in the form of a prayer to Jesus. Th speaker wants to make sure he remembers that humanity suffers on earth.

Jesus! thy Crucifix

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