Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson is one of best-loved American poets of all time. She is remembered for her hundreds of short poems, mostly written in ballad verse. Her poems touch on topics like love, fame, nature, and most commonly, death. She was a recluse throughout her life and it was only after her death that her poetry became widely known. Read more about Emily Dickinson.

Some of Dickinson’s most famous poems include Because I could not stop for DeathHope is the thing with Feathers, Wild Nights! – Wild Nights!, I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, and I heard a Fly buzz – when I died.

I Gave Myself To Him

‘I Gave Myself To Him’ by Emily Dickinson is a clever love poem. It gives the readers a glimpse of the intensity of a relationship between the speaker and her subject.

I heard a Fly buzz – when I died

‘I heard a Fly Buzz – when I died’ by Emily Dickinson is an unforgettable depiction of the moments before death. The speaker emphasizes the stillness of the room and the movements of a single fly.

I like a look of Agony

‘I like a look of Agony’ by Emily Dickinson expresses a speaker’s perception of pain. She sees it and knows that it’s real. This is something she takes comfort in. 

I like a look of Agony by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

If I can stop one heart from breaking

‘If I can stop one heart from breaking’ by Emily Dickinson is a selfless proclamation of one’s desire to help. The poet’s speaker offers help in a variety of ways in some cases to better her own life.

If those I loved were lost

‘If those I loved were lost’ by Emily Dickinson is a complex poem. It uses allusions to describe how the poet, or at least her speaker, would react to the loss of loved ones.

In The Garden

‘In the Garden’ by Emily Dickinson skillfully depicts nature. The poet focuses in on a garden and the bugs and birds one might see there.

Jesus! thy Crucifix

‘Jesus! thy Crucifix’ by Emily Dickinson is a short poem in the form of a prayer to Jesus. Th speaker wants to make sure he remembers that humanity suffers on earth.

jesus! thy crucifix by emily dickinson

May-Flower

‘May-Flower’ is a beautiful short poem in which Dickinson uses her skill with imagery to depict a forest scene, a May flower, and its connection to the human soul. 

My Garden — like the Beach

‘My Garden — like the Beach’ by Emily Dickinson is a beautiful, short poem. It compares the speaker’s garden to the beach and the summer to the sea. Read the full poem, with a complete analysis.

My Garden — like the Beach by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

My River runs to thee

In Emily Dickinson’s ‘My River runs to thee,’ readers explore an extended metaphor that may have sexual or religious undertones. 

Simplicity

‘Simplicity’ by Emily Dickinson speaks on the important concept of happiness. The speaker emphasizes how heavy the world can seem at times.

Some keep the Sabbath going to Church –

‘Some keep the Sabbath going to Church –’ is one of Emily Dickinson’s best-known poems. It features the poet’s growing disbelief regarding the customary Christian rituals and her intention to seek salvation without resorting to the conventional means.

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