Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson is one of best-loved American poets of all time. She is remembered for her hundreds of short poems, mostly written in ballad verse. Her poems touch on topics like love, fame, nature, and most commonly, death. She was a recluse throughout her life and it was only after her death that her poetry became widely known. Read more about Emily Dickinson.

Some of Dickinson’s most famous poems include Because I could not stop for DeathHope is the thing with Feathers, Wild Nights! – Wild Nights!, I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, and I heard a Fly buzz – when I died.

Some Rainbow – coming from the Fair!

‘Some rainbow – coming from the Fair!’ by Emily Dickinson delves into themes of spring, change, and rebirth. The poet depicts how the world changes when spring arrives.

Success is counted sweetest

‘Success is counted sweetest’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem about success. It emphasizes the fact that one must lose something in order to truly appreciate it.

Tell all the truth but tell it slant

‘Tell the truth but tell it slant’ by Emily Dickinson is one of Dickinson’s best-loved poems. It explores an unknown “truth” that readers must interpret in their own way.

That it will never come again

‘That it will never come again’ by Emily Dickinson is a short and thoughtful poem. In it, the poet presents a relatable opinion of life, its brevity, and its importance.

The Brain—is wider than the Sky

‘The Brain – is wider than the Sky’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on the complexity of the human brain. She celebrates its beauty and wonder.

The Bustle in a House

‘The Bustle in a House’ by Emily Dickinson is a short poem about the effects of death. It describes the “bustle” in a home the morning after an important loss.

The Bustle in a House by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

The Butterfly’s Day

‘The Butterfly’s Day’ is a beautiful poem written by the American poet Emily Dickinson. This poem presents the themes of the vanity of life and oblivion.

The Cricket Sang

‘The Cricket Sang’ by Emily Dickinson is a memorable nature poem. It focuses on the daily routines of all living things.

The Heart asks Pleasure – first

‘The heart asks pleasure first’ by Emily Dickinson depicts the needs of the heart. They are highly changeable and include pleasure and excuse from pain.

The Letter

‘The Letter’ by Emily Dickinson is a sweet love poem. It is told from the perceptive of a love letter.

The Lightning is a Yellow Fork

‘The Lightening is a Yellow Fork’ by Emily Dickinson is a highly original poem. It focuses on the sublime power of lightening and God.

The Past is such a Curious Creature

‘The past is such a Curious creature’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on the past, and personifies it as a female character. The poet’s speaker puts the feeling of one’s past into a few simple, relatable words.

The Rainbow Never Tells Me

‘The Rainbow never tells me’ by Emily Dickinson speaks on the knowledge inherent to nature. From a rainbow to the reoccurrence of spring, the speaker says the world is filled with wisdom.

The Sky is low — the Clouds are mean

‘The Sky is low — the Clouds are mean’ by Emily Dickinson is a creative poem about nature’s attitudes. The poet uses personification to depict the ups and downs of a particular storm. 

The Sky is low — the Clouds are mean Visual Representation

The Soul has Bandaged Moments

‘The Soul has Bandaged Moments’ by Emily Dickinson is a powerful poem that explores the human soul. It uses personification skillfully to describe the “Soul” and “Fear.”

The Soul has Bandaged Moments by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

The Soul selects her own Society

‘The soul selects her own Society’ by Emily Dickinson emphasizes the solitary nature of the “Soul.” As well as “her” ability to select the “one” she wants to give access to, and then shut out all the rest.

There is a pain—so utter

‘There is a pain—so utter’  by Emily Dickinson is a complicated poem. It uses abstract language to describe pain.

There is another sky

In the beautiful poem, ‘There is another sky,’ Dickinson addresses themes that are common to Shakespearean sonnets. These include writing as a way of preserving experience and beauty.

There is another sky by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

There is no Frigate like a Book

‘There is no Frigate like a Book’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on how joyful reading can be. The speaker compares reading to exploring and emphasizes its elements of escapism.

There’s a certain Slant of light

‘There’s a certain Slant of light’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem. It depicts a metaphorical slant of light and how it influences the speaker.

There’s been a Death, in the Opposite House

In ‘There’s been a Death, in the Opposite House’ Emily Dickinson explores themes of death and community. Through the use of a male speaker, she examines the actions of a small town after a death.

This is my letter to the world

‘This is my letter to the world’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on very relatable themes. These include isolation and the search for companionship.

To Fight Aloud, is Very Brave

‘To fight aloud, is very brave’ by Emily Dickinson compares inner and outer struggles. She emphasizes the former, suggesting it is far more complex and difficult than it seems.

To Know Just How He Suffered Would Be Dear

‘To Know Just How He Suffered Would Be Dear’ by Emily Dickinson is about suffering. The speaker explores what others experience, particularly one person she loved dearly.

Top 10 Emily Dickinson Love Poems

On this list, readers will find ten of the best Emily Dickinson love poems. These are just as complex as the rest of the poet’s work, reflecting her personal life and her perception of love.

Two Butterflies went out at Noon—

‘Two Butterflies went out at Noon—,’ by one of the greatest American poets, Emily Dickinson is a thought-provoking piece of art. It boundlessly captures the journey of two butterflies to eternity.

Victory comes late

‘Victory comes late’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful and complex poem. It explores the ways people interact with God and religion.

Why Do I Love You, Sir

‘Why Do I Love You, Sir’ by Emily Dickinson is about one person’s relationship with God. The speaker explores why she loves God through clear and memorable language.

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