Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson is one of best-loved American poets of all time. She is remembered for her hundreds of short poems, mostly written in ballad verse. Her poems touch on topics like love, fame, nature, and most commonly, death. She was a recluse throughout her life and it was only after her death that her poetry became widely known. Read more about Emily Dickinson.

Some of Dickinson’s most famous poems include Because I could not stop for DeathHope is the thing with Feathers, Wild Nights! – Wild Nights!, I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, and I heard a Fly buzz – when I died.

There came a Day—at Summer’s full

‘There came a Day—at Summer’s full’ by Emily Dickinson depicts two lovers in a tricky situation that keeps them apart. But, they know they’ll be reunited in the next life. 

There came a Day—at Summer’s full

There came a Wind like a Bugle

‘There came a Wind like a Bugle –’ by Emily Dickinson depicts the incredible power of the natural world. She describes a day when a storm nearly destroyed a series of homes. 

There came a Wind like a Bugle

There is a pain—so utter

‘There is a pain—so utter’  by Emily Dickinson is a complicated poem. It uses abstract language to describe pain.

There is another sky

In the beautiful poem, ‘There is another sky,’ Dickinson addresses themes that are common to Shakespearean sonnets. These include writing as a way of preserving experience and beauty.

There is another sky

There is no Frigate like a Book

‘There is no Frigate like a Book’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on how joyful reading can be. The speaker compares reading to exploring and emphasizes its elements of escapism.

There’s a certain Slant of light

‘There’s a certain Slant of light’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem. It depicts a metaphorical slant of light and how it influences the speaker.

There’s been a Death, in the Opposite House

In ‘There’s been a Death, in the Opposite House’ Emily Dickinson explores themes of death and community. Through the use of a male speaker, she examines the actions of a small town after a death.

This is my letter to the world

‘This is my letter to the world’ by Emily Dickinson focuses on very relatable themes. These include isolation and the search for companionship.

To Fight Aloud, is Very Brave

‘To fight aloud, is very brave’ by Emily Dickinson compares inner and outer struggles. She emphasizes the former, suggesting it is far more complex and difficult than it seems.

To Know Just How He Suffered Would Be Dear

‘To Know Just How He Suffered Would Be Dear’ by Emily Dickinson is about suffering. The speaker explores what others experience, particularly one person she loved dearly.

Top 10 Emily Dickinson Love Poems

On this list, readers will find ten of the best Emily Dickinson love poems. These are just as complex as the rest of the poet’s work, reflecting her personal life and her perception of love.

Two Butterflies went out at Noon—

‘Two Butterflies went out at Noon—,’ by one of the greatest American poets, Emily Dickinson is a thought-provoking piece of art. It boundlessly captures the journey of two butterflies to eternity.

Victory comes late

‘Victory comes late’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful and complex poem. It explores the ways people interact with God and religion.

What mystery pervades a well!

‘What mystery pervades a well!’ by Emily Dickinson describe limits to ones knowledge no matter how much time they spend of the natural world.

What mystery pervades a well!

Whose cheek is this?

‘Whose cheek is this?’ by Emily Dickinson is a complicated poem in which the poet describes finding a flower that metaphorically resembles a dead girl.

Whose cheek is this?

Why Do I Love You, Sir

‘Why Do I Love You, Sir’ by Emily Dickinson is about one person’s relationship with God. The speaker explores why she loves God through clear and memorable language.

Wild nights – Wild nights!

‘Wild nights – Wild nights!’ by Emily Dickinson is a multi-faceted poem. It explores an ambiguous relationship that could be religious or sexual.

Your Riches — taught me — Poverty

‘Your Riches — taught me — Poverty’ by Emily Dickinson is about wealth and possessions. She addresses a personal friend and explores these subjects through the eyes of an adult.

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