Confidence

Courage by Anna Akhmatova

‘Courage’ by Anna Akhmatova is a passionate poem about courage in the face of war. Specifically, Akhmatova was writing about World War II. 

For Nanabhai Bhatt by Sujata Bhatt

‘For Nanabhai Bhatt’ is about the poet Sujata Bhatt’s grandfather, Nanabhai Bhatt, who was an educationist and activist active during the Indian independence movement.

Iris by Sujata Bhatt

‘Iris’ by Sujata Bhatt is a narrative poem with lyric qualities. It depicts an artist’s wait for the sun to come out and bring out the colors in a single iris.

The Same Note by Jackie Kay

‘The Same Note’ by Jackie Kay depicts Bessie Smith’s musical ability and how she could unite people from all walks of life. 

This World is not Conclusion

‘This World is not Conclusion’ is a deeply thoughtful exploration of faith and doubt from one of America’s finest poets.

Holy Sonnet IX by John Donne

‘Holy Sonnet IX’ by John Donne, also known by its first line ‘If poisonous minerals, and if that tree’ is one of several “Holy Sonnets” the poet composed during his lifetime. This particular poem focuses on a dispute between the speaker and God.

Winter Song by Elizabeth Tollett

‘Winter Song’ by Elizabeth Tollett is a poem about steadfast love and devotion to one person. The speaker uses the twenty-four lines to banish any thought from their lover’s mind that they are thinking about being unfaithful.

Into My Own by Robert Frost

Robert Frost’s ‘Into My Own’ explores the concepts of maturity and growing up. The poet delves into the exploration of childhood and self.

There came a Day—at Summer’s full

‘There came a Day—at Summer’s full’ by Emily Dickinson depicts two lovers in a tricky situation that keeps them apart. But, they know they’ll be reunited in the next life. 

Australia 1970 by Judith Wright

‘Australia 1970’ by Judith Wright speaks on the changing landscape of Australia in the 1970s. It promotes a version of Australia that is fierce, wild, and dangerous just like the animals that have always lived within its boundaries.

The Window by Diane di Prima

‘The Window,’ an interesting poem is written by the Beat poet Diane di Prima, compares poetry to a “window” to a writer’s soul. It showcases how poetry captures the very essence of the poet and her thoughts.

To Beachey, 1912 by Carl Sandburg

‘To Beachey, 1912‘ by Carl Sandburg is a poem that expresses the author’s appreciation for aviation. The main character of the poem is flying in an airplane, and from high up, he is able to really appreciate the beauty of the blue sky.

The Constant Lover by Sir John Suckling

‘The Constant Lover’ by Sir John Suckling presents an interesting view of love. It’s told from the perspective of a man who has recently fallen for a new woman.

The Soul selects her own Society

‘The soul selects her own Society’ by Emily Dickinson emphasizes the solitary nature of the “Soul.” As well as “her” ability to select the “one” she wants to give access to, and then shut out all the rest.

Fame is a bee

‘Fame is a bee’ by Emily Dickinson uses a bee to describe the fleeting nature of fame. She uses clever images and original poetic writing throughout.

Much Madness is divinest Sense

‘Much Madness is divinest Sense’ by Emily Dickinson is an exacting and poignant poem that expresses the speaker’s opinion of sanity and insanity. 

Poem by Eeyore by A.A. Milne

‘Poem by Eeyore’ is one of the best poems A.A. Milne wrote featuring characters from Winnie-the-Pooh. In this case, Eeyore shares his relatable thoughts about writing.

Pretty Ugly by Abdullah Shoaib

‘Pretty Ugly’ by Abdullah Shoaib cleverly explores the ups and downs of self-worth, body image, and confidence. The poem is meant to inspire readers to love themselves for who they are.

A little Dog that wags his tail

In ‘A little Dog that wags his tail’ Emily Dickinson explores themes of human nature, the purpose of life, and freedom. She compares animals, cats and dogs, to adults and children.

The Heart asks Pleasure – first

‘The heart asks pleasure first’ by Emily Dickinson depicts the needs of the heart. They are highly changeable and include pleasure and excuse from pain.

Tell all the truth but tell it slant

‘Tell the truth but tell it slant’ by Emily Dickinson is one of Dickinson’s best-loved poems. It explores an unknown “truth” that readers must interpret in their own way.

My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun

‘My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun’ by Emily Dickinson is a complex, metaphorical poem. The poet depicts a woman who is under a man’s control and sleeps like a load gun.

It Couldn’t Be Done by Edgar Albert Guest 

‘It Couldn’t Be Done’ by Edgar Albert Guest is a poem with an uplifting message about never giving up. The narrator of the poem encourages the reader not to be discouraged by the pessimism of others.

There’s a certain Slant of light

‘There’s a certain Slant of light’ by Emily Dickinson is a thoughtful poem. It depicts a metaphorical slant of light and how it influences the speaker.

I’m Nobody! Who are you?

‘I’m Nobody! Who are you?’ by Emily Dickinson reflects the poet’s emotions. It reveals her disdain for publicity and her preference for privacy.

To Fight Aloud, is Very Brave

‘To fight aloud, is very brave’ by Emily Dickinson compares inner and outer struggles. She emphasizes the former, suggesting it is far more complex and difficult than it seems.

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