Anthropomorphism

Anthropomorphism is used to make inanimate objects, forces and animals appear to actually be human beings. The literary device has at its root in two greek words meaning “human” and “form.” It was first used in the mid 1700s to point out instances of heresy as Christians depicted God in human form. Anthropomorphism is a kind of personification, but they are so similar that they are often used interchangeably. Personification is used to create powerful images, and as mentioned above, anthropomorphism is used to make inanimate objects, forces and animals appear to actually be human beings.

Some of the most obvious examples of this literary device come from children’s literature and entertainment, such as The Lion King and Winnie the Pooh. But it can be used to in a much more harrowing way, such as in George Orwell’s Animal Farm. One great example within poetry is John Keats’ Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art’.

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Synonyms:
anthropomorphised, anthropomorphic, anthropomorphous, humanlike
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