Remember by Christina Rossetti

In this famous sonnet, ‘Remember’, written in 1849, the poet, Christina Rossetti, introduces the themes of love, death, and reaction to death.

Harriet Beecher Stowe by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Dunbar was inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, as it was one of the first works of literature to shed light on the brutality and cruelty of slavery.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver

In short, ‘Wild Geese’ is a poem, written by Mary Oliver, that expresses what one must do in order to lead a good life.

O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman

Saddened by the results of the American civil war, Walt Whitman wrote the elegy, ‘O Captain! My Captain!’ in memory of deceased American President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. The civil war occurred during his lifetime with Whitman a staunch supporter of unionists.

Song of Solomon – Chapter 3

Chapter 3 begins with the dream of the woman speaker, the shepherdess, where she “sought him” when she was on her “bed by night”.

Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins

‘Introduction to Poetry’ by Billy Collins is a beautiful poem that speaks about the nature of poetry. The poet considers how poetry should be appreciated and comprehended.

Ode to a Nightingale by John Keats

‘Ode to a Nightingale’ was written in 1819, and it is the longest one, with 8 stanzas of 10 lines each and is one of six famous odes John Keats wrote.

Song of Solomon – Chapter 2

The second chapter of the Song of Solomon quickly reveals that the woman is still the main speaker. Her voice begins chapter 2.

Harlem (A Dream Deferred) by Langston Hughes

‘Harlem (A Dream Deferred)’ by Langston Hughes is a powerful poem. The poet wrote it in response to what he felt as a black man navigating a career and personal life in a white-dominated world.

If You Forget Me by Pablo Neruda

‘If You Forget Me’ speaks directly to the author’s lover, warning her what will happen if she falls out of love with the speaker.

Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen immortalized mustard gas in his indictment against warfare, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est.’ Written in 1917 while at Craiglockart, and published posthumously in 1920, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ details what is, perhaps, the most memorable written account of a mustard gas attack.

A Dream within a Dream by Edgar Allan Poe

Published in 1849, ‘A Dream Within a Dream’ by Edgar Allan Poe examines the subtleties of time. His speaker delves into our perception of it and its effects.

Sonnet 8 by Louise Labé

The French poet Louise Labé, who wrote Sonnet 8, lived as a middle-class citizen in 16th century France. In this poem, she used the Petrarchan form to explain the positive and negative effects of love.

The Revenant by Billy Collins

In the poem, ‘The Revenant’, Billy Collins channels the spirit of a deceased dog and subverts the accepted relationship of man and his best friend.

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