Earth

Our revels now are ended by William Shakespeare

‘Our revels now are ended’ is the name given to one of the best-known speeches from William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. It can be found in Act IV, Scene 1, and is spoken by Prospero. 

Our revels now are ended by William Shakespeare Visual Representation

Earth by John Hall Wheelock

‘Earth’ by John Hall Wheelock is a short poem that addresses humanity’s intelligence. It features a Martian astronomer who is considering what happened to planet Earth. 

Earth by John Hall Wheelock Visual Representation

The Unfinished by Laurie Sheck

‘The Unfinished’ by Laurie Sheck is a complex and powerful poem about meaning, the purpose of life, and free will.

the unfinished by laurie sheck

Redemption by George Herbert

‘Redemption’ by George Herbert speaks on one man’s long journey to find God amongst the secular, and therefore the ability to start a new life.

A Hymn to God the Father by John Donne

‘A Hymn to God the Father’ by John Donne is a well-loved poem about God and religion. It contains a speaker’s prayers that he be forgiven a series of unnamed sins.

Talking in Bed by Philip Larkin

‘Talking in Bed’ by Philip Larkin depicts the difficulties a speaker has talking in bed with his lover. It’s a poem about how loneliness can invade even the most initmate moments.

The Pig by Roald Dahl

‘The Pig’ by Roald Dahl describes the thought process of an intelligent pig that realizes he is being raised to become a meal for humans. 

The Sign-Post by Edward Thomas

‘The Sign-Post’ by Edward Thomas contains a discussion within a speaker’s mind about the progression of time and the nature of Heaven. 

To Earthward by Robert Frost

‘To Earthward’ by Robert Frost contemplates the speaker’s connection to the earth. As he’s aged, he’s sought out more painful experiences in order to feel the same as he did in his youth.

The Thaw by Henry David Thoreau

‘The Thaw’ by Henry David Thoreau describes a speaker’s desire to be an integral part of an ecosystem, and his acceptance that he has to remain “silent.”

On Time by John Milton

‘On Time’ by John Milton describes the one element of human existence which must be extinguished for a truly utopian world to exist.

The History of Red by Linda Hogan

‘The History of Red’ by Linda Hogan describes the life of the color “red” and how it has represented humankind’s will to live through time.

Winter by Walter de la Mare

‘Winter’ by Walter de la Mare tells of the stark beauty of the winter months and how the constellations look down upon the cold earth.

The Ivy Green by Charles Dickens

‘The Ivy Green’ by Charles Dickens describes the resilient characteristics of green ivy and its ability to make a feast of what humans leaves behind. 

Check by James Brunton Stephens

‘Check’ by James Bunton Stephens is a short poem that presents a personified description of the coming of night as a woman.

De Profundis by Christina Rossetti

‘De Profundis’ by Christina Rossetti describes a speaker’s longing for heaven, and the impossibility of reaching it during one’s lifetime. 

The Answer by Sara Teasdale

‘The Answer’ by Sara Teasdale is a short lyric poem made out of two eight lines stanzas that are mostly written in free verse. Analysis of The Answer First Stanza When I go back to earth And all my joyous body Puts off the red and white That once had been so proud, If men should pass above With false and feeble pity, My dust will find a voice To answer them aloud: The speaker of ‘The Answer’, who is perhaps the poet herself, begins the poem by describing the future state of her body.

Darkness by Lord Byron

‘Darkness’ by Lord Byron serves as a warning against the growing inequality in Byron’s time and a prediction for what will happen to the planet if the human race does not change. 

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