Sylvia Plath

Although Sylvia Plath was succeeding poetically, she was still deeply unhappy. She tried to kill herself a number of times throughout the early 60s, and in February of 1963, she succeeded. Plath is considered to be one of the best poets of her generation.  Read more about Sylvia Plath.

Poppies in October

‘Poppies in October’ by Sylvia Plath depicts an interesting contrast between life and death. It takes a melancholy tone and can be interpreted in different ways.

Stars Over the Dordogne

‘Stars Over the Dordogne’ by Sylvia Plath is a personal, confessional poem. It provides the reader insight into the poet’s battle with depression.

Stings

‘Stings’ by Sylvia Plath is a complex poem that uses bees as a metaphor. It describes the changes a speaker goes through as she considers the role of a queen bee in a hive.

The Arrival of the Bee Box

‘The Arrival of the Bee Box’ by Sylvia Plath depicts a speaker’s chaotic mind. The poet uses the bee box to represent how confined the speaker feels and the bees as a demonstration of her thought patterns.

The Colossus

‘The Colossus’ by Sylvia Plath explores the poet’s relationship with her father. Through incredibly original imagery, her father is depicted as a fallen statue and her as his keeper.

The Moon and the Yew Tree

‘The Moon and the Yew Tree’ by Sylvia Plath defines the poet’s relationship with her parents. It’s a poem that’s just as beautiful as it is complicated.

The Times are Tidy

‘The Times are Tidy’ by Sylvia Plath is a poem about the past and present. The speaker expresses her dissatisfaction with society.

To Time

‘To Time’ by Sylvia Plath explores the meaning of time. It depicts time as a machine that moves through history, depleting it of all purpose.

Top 16 of the Best Sylvia Plath Poems

Sylvia Plath is one of the most famous poets of the 20th century, and certainly one of the most tragic. Her poems are equal parts thoughtful and heartbreaking.

Tulips

‘Tulips’ by Sylvia Plath is a personal and confessional poem. It explores the poet’s innermost emotions and mental state.

Walking in Winter

‘Walking in Winter’ by Sylvia Plath tells the story of hotel residents. They’re living different lives but are unified through their hopelessness.

Winter Landscape, with Rooks

‘Winter Landscape, with Rooks’ by Sylvia Plath depicts a dark landscape. It’s used to symbolize how the speaker, and perhaps the poet, was feeling.

You’re

‘You’re’ by Sylvia Plath is an ode to an unborn child. It explores the speaker’s expectations of motherhood and what emotions she’s going to feel.

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