Poems from the 19th Century

The influential verse of the 19th century included the work of poets like William Wordsworth, John Keats, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, and many more. 19th-century poets are among the most influential and well-read of all time. Their incredible work has inspired generations of writers, reaching to the present day.

A Wounded Deer—leaps highest by Emily Dickinson

‘A Wounded Deer—leaps highest’ by Emily Dickinson is a highly relatable poem that speaks about the difference between what someone or something looks like and the truth. She uses the examples of a fatally wounded deer and someone dying of tuberculosis.

A Wounded Deer--leaps highest by Emily Dickinson Visual Representation

A Woman Waits for Me by Walt Whitman

Formerly known as ‘Poem of Procreation,’ Whitman’s ‘A Woman Waits for Me’ is all about the power of regeneration, procreation, and creativity.

A Woman Waits for Me by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

Earth Voices by Bliss Carman

‘Earth Voices’ by Bliss Carman is a clever poem that utilizes personification in order to convey the perspective of the sun, the wind, and the rain.

Earth Voices by Bliss Carman Visual Representation

The Duel by Eugene Field

‘The Duel,’ one of the best-known poems of Eugene Field, tells the oddly amusing tale of the gingham dog and the calico cat.

The Duel by Eugene Field Visual Representation

Politics by William Butler Yeats

‘Politics’ by William Butler Yeats is the last lyric poem Yeats wrote. It alludes to wars around the world including World War II which was to begin the year after this poem was written. 

Politics by William Butler Yeats Visual Representation

The Chambered Nautilus by Oliver Wendell Holmes

‘The Chambered Nautilus’ by Oliver Wendell Holmes is an interesting and beautiful poem. In it, the poet describes the nautilus and the life of struggle and improvement it engages in.

The Chambered Nautilus by Oliver Wendell Holmes Visual Representation

The Harvest Moon by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

‘The Harvest Moon’ by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow describes the way that the light of the harvest moon touches everything. It is an indication that fall is here and that winter is on its way. 

The Harvest Moon by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Visual Representation

Ten Little Soldiers (And Then There Were None)

‘Ten Little Soldiers’ was included in Agatha Christie’s classic mystery novel, ‘And Then There Were None.’ It iserves as an epigraph, appearing at the beginning of the book, and is connected with all ten deaths that occur on the island. It is unclear who wrote the first version of this nursery rhyme.

Ten Little Soldier Boys Visual Representation

Gold! by Thomas Hood

‘Gold!’ by Thomas Hood is a piece about the corrupting nature of gold. It focuses on the duality of the substance. It can save but, it can also doom the person seeking it out. 

Gold! by Thomas Hood Visual Representation

The Wind by Robert Louis Stevenson

‘The Wind’ by Robert Louis Stevenson inquires into the nature of the wind. Stevenson uses a young speaker in order to adequately convey a child-like wonder of this common element.

The Wind by Robert Louis Stevenson Visual Representation

Windy Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson

‘Windy Nights’ by Robert Louis Stevenson is a children’s poem about a nighttime storm. It was first published in 1885 in A Child’s Garden of Verses. 

Windy Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson Visual Representation

Freedom by Rabindranath Tagore

‘Freedom’ by Rabindranath Tagore is a powerful and effective poem about freedom. The speaker spends the seventeen lines of the poem describing the kind of freedom he hopes his country will find.

Freedom by Rabindranath Tagore Visual Representation

To a Stranger by Walt Whitman

‘To a Stranger’ by Walt Whitman describes a connection the speaker feels to a stranger they pass on the street. 

To a Stranger by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

Broadway by Walt Whitman

‘Broadway’ by Walt Whitman is a short, effective poem that speaks to the nature of contemporary life. It focuses in on one street in New York City.

Broadway by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

Horace to Leuconoe by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Edwin Arlington Robinson’s sonnet ‘Horace to Leuconoe’ is a passionate address of a lover to a girl, brooding over what God might have in store for her. He advises her to seize the moment and forget about the past and the future.

Horace to Leuconoe by Edwin Arlington Robinson Visual Representation

The Dalliance of the Eagles by Walt Whitman

Whitman’s ‘The Dalliance of the Eagles’ depicts a fierce yet amorous scene of the birds of prey, briefly consummating in the open sky and then parting in their own ways. This poem was not received favorably due to its explicit depiction of sexuality.

The Dalliance of the Eagles by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

Spirits of the Dead by Edgar Allan Poe

‘Spirits of the Dead’ by Edgar Allan Poe is a beautiful poem that describes life and death. Specifically, the poet dwells on what it means to move from one world to the next. 

Spirits of the Dead by Edgar Allan Poe Visual Representation

An Army Corps on the March by Walt Whitman

Whitman’s ‘An Army Corps on the March’ is a moving depiction of soldiers marching forward tirelessly during the Civil War. No matter how exhausted they were, they had a goal to fulfill and a dream to achieve!

An Army Corps on the March by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

On Seeing the Elgin Marbles by John Keats

‘On Seeing the Elgin Marbles’ by John Keats is a poem about mortality. The speaker observes the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum and is moved by their power. 

On Seeing the Elgin Marbles by John Keats Visual Representation

The Sower by Victor-Marie Hugo

‘The Sower’ by Victor-Marie Hugo reveals the musings of a poet persona as he observes an old sower working in his fields till night.

The Sower by Victor Marie Hugo Visual Representation

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