Poems from A Shropshire Lad

A Shropshire Lad is a collection of sixty-three poems by A.E. Housman. It was published in 1896 and is today considered to be his greatest accomplishment. Within the volume, Housman writes on themes ranging from unattainable love, to sorrow, and death. It includes many examples of pastoral landscapes and a variety of viewpoints and speakers.

Terence, This is Stupid Stuff by A. E. Housman

‘Terence, This is Stupid Stuff’ by A. E. Housman addresses a speaker’s poetry, how he feels about another’s opinion, and alludes to critiques of Housman’s own literary works.

Loveliest of Trees by A. E. Housman

‘Loveliest of Trees’ by A.E. Housman is a joyful nature poem in which the speaker describes how powerful the image of cherry blossom trees is in his life. He takes a great deal of pleasure from looking at them.

To an Athlete Dying Young by A. E. Housman

‘To an Athlete Dying Young’ by A. E. Housman describes the death of a youthful man who is celebrated for his glorious passing and remembered for his loss, rather than his athletic achievements.

When I Was One-and-Twenty by A. E. Housman

‘When I Was One-and-Twenty’ by A. E. Housman is a relatable poem that explores how easy it is to make mistakes in one’s love life, even when one knows exactly what they should do.

Bredon Hill by A. E. Housman

‘Bredon Hill’ by A.E. Housman depicts an initially heartwarming and later heartbreaking story of a couple torn apart when one of them dies suddenly on a cold Christmas night. 

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