Poems about Beauty

Pour l’amour de ma doulce amye

‘Pour l’amour de ma doulce amye’ or ‘For the love of my sweet lady,’ is a French lyric composed in the 15th century. It is dedicated to a woman the writer loved. 

Pour l'amour de ma doulce amye Visual Representation

Peter Quince at the Clavier by Wallace Stevens

‘Peter Quince at the Clavier’ by Wallace Stevens is a musical depiction of the story of Susanna and the Elders from the Book of Daniel. It describes the “feeling” of “music” and the nature of beauty.

Peter Quince at the Clavier by Wallace Stevens Visual Representation

Why Flowers Change Color by Robert Herrick

‘Why Flowers Change Color’ by Robert Herrick is a short poem that speaks about virginity, virgins, and the reason that flowers change colors. The poem is often interpreted in different ways due to the few details Herrick provides in the four lines. 

Why Flowers Change Colors by Robert Herrick Visual Representation

Sally’s Hair by John Koethe

‘Sally’s Hair’ by John Koethe is a short and effective poem in which the speaker looks back on someone he met thirty-seven years ago and wonders where she is now.

Sally's Hair by John Koethe Visual Representation

I Shall Paint My Nails Red by Carole Satyamurti

‘I Shall Paint My Nails Red’ by Carole Satyamurti is a poem about why a female speaker painted her nails. The simple premise is made more complicated as she lists out the reasons why she painted her nails red. 

'I Shall Paint My Nails Red’ by Carole Satyamurti

Never Trust a Mirror by Erin Hanson

‘Never Trust a Mirror’ by Erin Hanson is a poem about beauty and self-worth. The poet describes the untrustworthy nature of a mirror and how one shouldn’t take what they see in it for granted. 

Never Trust a Mirror by Erin Hanson Visual Representation

Notice by Robert Lowell

A thought-provoking piece from Robert Lowell’s incredible array of poetry, ‘Notice’ harks for capturing each and every moment of our lives, be it repeated or unbearable. We have to draw inspiration from tiny details in our lives.

Notice by Robert Lowell Visual Representation

Down, Wanton, Down! by Robert Graves

‘Down, Wanton, Down!’ is a direct address to “wanton” or the urge to have unrestrained sexual relationships. The speaker rebukes the desire/person by describing the value of “Love” and “Beauty.”

Down, Wanton, Down! by Robert Graves Visual Representation

Chinoiseries by Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell’s ‘Chinoiseries’ is an ekphrastic poem depicting the engravings on chinoiserie pottery. Lowell’s speaker gets lost in the art as if it is the eyes of her loved one.

Chinoiseries by Amy Lowell Visual Representation

The Flower by Robert Creeley

In ‘The Flower,’ Robert Creeley meditates upon a full-blooded flower and tries to fill his soul with its spiritual energy. He creates a contrast between awakening and ignorance through the image of the “patient flower.”

The Flower by Robert Creeley Visual Representation

Saint Francis and the Sow by Galway Kinnell

‘Saint Francis and the Sow,’ a poem from Galway Kinnell’s collection Mortal Acts, Mortal Words (1980), explores the spiritual beauty inside each creature that is needed to be retaught and retouched for spiritual growth.

Saint Francis and the Sow by Galway Kinnell

There is a Garden in Her Face by Thomas Campion

‘There is a Garden in Her Face’ by Thomas Campion is a poem about a woman’s beauty. It also contains a warning to suitors that she won’t let anyone kiss her or come near her in any meaningful way. 

There is a Garden in Her Face by Thomas Campion Visual Representation

Morning Poem by Mary Oliver

‘Morning Poem’ by Mary Oliver uses the dawn of a new day to speak of hope and new beginnings, offering an optimistic message.

Morning Poem by Mary Oliver Visual Representation

Girl Friend by C.D. Wright

C.D. Wright’s ‘Girl Friend’ poems appear in her poetry collection Steal Away (2002). This love poem is dedicated to Nina, the speaker’s girlfriend whom he first saw a few years ago.

Girl Friend by C.D. Wright Visual Representation

The Throwback by Paul Muldoon

‘The Throwback’ by Paul Muldoon is a thoughtful poem. In it, the speaker celebrates his partner’s heritage and relates it back to Ancient Greece.

The Constant Lover by Sir John Suckling

‘The Constant Lover’ by Sir John Suckling presents an interesting view of love. It’s told from the perspective of a man who has recently fallen for a new woman.

the constant lover by sir john suckling

Madonna Mia by Oscar Wilde

‘Madonna Mia’ by Oscar Wilde is a beautiful and interesting poem. In it, the speaker describes a “lily-girl.” 

Madonna Mia by Oscar Wilde Visual Representation

Bobby Shafto’s Gone to Sea

‘Bobby Shafto’s Gone to Sea’ is a traditional English folk song and nursery rhyme. It describes a speaker’s longing for her love, Bobby Shafto, who is out on a sea voyage.

Bobby Shafto’s Gone to Sea

Sonnet 128 by William Shakespeare

‘Sonnet 128,’ also known as ‘How oft when thou, my music, music play’st,’ is a sensuous poem. In it, the speaker describes the way his mistress plays the harpsichord and how he longs to touch her.

Sonnet 128 by William Shakespeare visual representation

10 of the Most Beautiful Poems about Beaches

The following list presents 10 beautiful poems that will inspire you about the beauty of the beaches. These poems would help you to see the calm and serene beauty of a beach, through the eyes of different poets.

Best Poems about Beach Visual Representation

Dead Deer by David Groff

‘Dead Deer’ by David Groff is a memorable poem about death. It describes a car accident in which the speaker and a deer lose their lives.

Sonnet 145 by William Shakespeare

‘Sonnet 145,’ also known as ‘Those lips that Love’s own hand did make,’ details a woman’s changing regard for the speaker. It’s a simple poem with good examples of figurative language.

Sonnet 144 by William Shakespeare

‘Sonnet 144,’ also known as ‘Two loves I have of comfort and despair,’ expresses the speaker’s fears in regard to the Fair Youth’s purity. The poem is concerned with how he may be corrupted by the Dark Lady.

Sonnet 120 by William Shakespeare

‘Sonnet 120,’ also known as ‘That you were once unkind befriends me now,’ is one of several sonnets the speaker spends apologizing for his infidelity. He hopes their sins will cancel one another out. 

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