Poems from the British Romantic Period (1785-1830)

Expostulation and Reply by William Wordsworth

‘Expostulation and Reply’ a ballad, written by William Wordsworth, tells the story of Matthew, dissuading the speaker (William) from idling away his precious time in “wise passiveness” or simply daydreaming.

Expostulation and Reply by William Wordsworth Visual Representation

Winter by Anne Hunter

‘Winter’ by Anne Hunter cleverly personifies winter as a “tyrant” who has complete control over those most in need.

October, 1803 by William Wordsworth

‘October, 1803’ by William Wordsworth describes England’s fear over an expected French invasion and how the speaker sees the world being transformed.

London by William Blake

Imagine waking up in London in the 1800s. You might find yourself surrounded by prostitutes, the homeless, and many more suffering in dilapidated housing. These are only a few of the haunting sights William Blake documents in ‘London.’

Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley

‘Ode to the West Wind’ was written in Cascine Woods, outside of Florence, Italy, and published in 1820. It focuses on death’s necessary destruction and the possibilities of rebirth.

Lucy Gray by William Wordsworth

Any readers familiar with William Wordsworth’s poetry, such as ‘Lucy Gray,’ know that the death of a child is a common theme throughout his works. Wordsworth suffered the loss of his own son and daughter, and those deaths seem to forever haunt him.

Ode on Melancholy by John Keats

‘Ode on Melancholy,’ while not amongst the most lauded of the Odes, is perhaps the most uplifting and hopeful of all of Keat’s Odes. Keats addresses the reader, a sufferer of Melancholy, and tells him not to worry.

Ode on Melancholy by John Keats Visual Representation

Jerusalem: And did those feet in ancient time by William Blake

‘Jerusalem’ is a famous, prophetic, melancholic, and classic poem, penned by maestro William Blake in 1804. It may seem like a patriotic poem, yet it’s misleading, adding to the irony is the fact that it’s an unofficial national anthem of England.

Jerusalem by William Blake Visual Representation

Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats

‘Ode on a Grecian Urn,’ an ekphrastic poem, is one of John Keats’ “Great Odes of 1819”.
“Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all”, have you ever wondered how confident a poet can be to utter these memorable words?

Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats Visual Representation

The Angel by William Blake

William Blake’s ‘The Angel,’ told through the frame of an angel that appears in a dream to the narrator throughout the course of their life. This poem was published in Blake’s collection “Songs of Experience” in 1794.

The Angel by William Blake Visual Representation

La Belle Dame sans Merci by John Keats

‘La Belle Dame sans Merci’ is Keats’ life and emotions set into verse. It is a story of unrequited love, illness, and the impossibility of being with whom one cares for when they are from different social classes.

La Belle Dame sans Merci by John Keats Visual Representation

The Tyger by William Blake

‘The Tyger’ is a well-known poem by William Blake. It explores the dark and destructive side of God and his creation.

The Tyger by William Blake Visual Representation

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth’s literary classic, ‘Daffodils,’ also known as ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,’ is one of the most popular poems in the English language. It is a quintessential poem of the Romantic movement.

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