Fighting

The Duel by Eugene Field

‘The Duel,’ one of the best-known poems of Eugene Field, tells the oddly amusing tale of the gingham dog and the calico cat.

The Duel by Eugene Field Visual Representation

1861 by Walt Whitman

‘1861’ by Walt Whitman is a moving Civil War poem written from the perspective of a soldier. He details the difficulty of a particular year. 

1861 by Walt Whitman Visual Representation

The Laboratory by Robert Browning

‘The Laboratory’ is one of Browning’s most popular dramatic monologues in which we discover the evil schemings of a spurned wife, plotting the demise of her rival.

Dreamers by Siegfried Sassoon

‘Dreamers’ by Siegfried Sassoon speakers on the inner, dream-like lives of soldiers fighting in the trenches of World War I. 

The Glove and the Lions by Leigh Hunt

‘The Glove and the Lions’ by Leigh Hunt describes the dangerous games of love played in the royal court of the king and the consequences of going too far. 

Doing it Wrong by Carol Parsons

‘Doing it Wrong’ by Carol Parsons describes the relationship between a brother and sister and the building frustrations between the two. 

Karachi by Toufiq Rafat

‘Karachi’ by Toufiq Rafat describes the natural forces that besiege the city of Karachi and the ongoing fight for survival that occurs within it. 

Spring in War Time by Sara Teasdale

‘Spring in War Time’ is a lyric poem contemplating war and its strength; as well as its inability to stop the seasons from changing and spring from coming.

Attack by Siegfried Sassoon

Attack’ by Siegfried Sassoon is an eye-opening poem about the harsh reality of war and what it feels like to be a soldier.

Beat! Beat! Drums! by Walt Whitman

The commentary that Whitman provides in ‘Beat! Beat! Drums!’, in regard to the American Civil war, is that it’s all-encompassing and negative.

The Correspondent by Agha Shahid Ali

‘The Correspondent’ by Agha Shahid Ali reveals the terrifying state of two countries – Kashmir and Bosnia. Both countries are facing a terrible situation in which innocents lose their lives.

The Last Laugh by Wilfred Owen

In ‘The Last Laugh,’ Wilfred Owen explores the sudden death of three soldiers, who, when dying, invoked their loved ones or religion in a bid to feel closer.

Exposure by Wilfred Owen

‘Exposure’ offers an in-depth view of life in the frosted winter of Northern France, where soldiers on duty would be left exposed to the elements.

Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen immortalized mustard gas in his indictment against warfare, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est.’ Written in 1917 while at Craiglockart, and published posthumously in 1920, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ details what is, perhaps, the most memorable written account of a mustard gas attack.

Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen

As the First World War raged on to its completion, Wilfred Owen, the poem, spent the final days of the war incarcerated in Craiglockhart, suffering from an acute case of shellshock and trying to write through the trauma using poetry.

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