Industrialization

Howl by Allen Ginsberg

‘Howl’ is Allen Ginsberg’s best-known poem and is commonly considered his greatest work. It is an indictment of modern society and a celebration of anyone living outside it.

Howl by Allen Ginsberg Visual Representation

The Planners by Boey Kim Cheng

‘The Planners’ by Boey Kim Cheng is a powerful poem about the way that development and the creation of new infrastructure makes the world a less interesting place to live in. 

The Planners by Boey Kim Cheng Visual Representation

The City Limits by A.R. Ammons

‘The City Limits’ by A.R. Ammons is a powerful poem about nature. In it, the speaker supports spending more time in the natural world versus time in industrialized city centers. 

The City Limits by A.R. Ammons Visual Representation

Inexpensive Progress by John Betjeman

‘Inexpensive Progress’ by John Betjeman is an incredibly effective poem. In it, the speaker acknowledges and speaks out against the way industrialism is removing humanity’s access to history and nature. 

Inexpensive Progress by John Betjeman Visual Representation

Cargoes by John Masefield

‘Cargoes’ by John Masefield is a well-loved, short poem that explores cargo ships. The poet empathizes the way the ships have changed throughout history.

Anecdote of the Jar by Wallace Stevens

‘Anecdote of the Jar’ is a poem that expresses, through the story of “a jar” and “a hill,” the progressive overtaking of industry over nature.

Jerusalem: And did those feet in ancient time by William Blake

‘Jerusalem’ is a famous, prophetic, melancholic, and classic poem, penned by maestro William Blake in 1804. It may seem like a patriotic poem, yet it’s misleading, adding to the irony is the fact that it’s an unofficial national anthem of England.

Jerusalem by William Blake Visual Representation

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