William Blake

William Blake was unrecognized during his lifetime but since his death, he has become known as one of the greatest artistic and literary geniuses of the 18th and 19th centuries. Read more about William Blake.

Some of Blake’s most famous poems include The Tyger, The Schoolboy, The Lamb, A Poison Tree, and London.

The Clod and the Pebble

In the three-stanza poem, ‘The Clod and the Pebble,’ William Blake takes on the subject of love and its meaning for two separate things, one being a “Clod” and another being a “Pebble.”

The Land of Dreams

In ‘The Land of Dreams,’ William Blake depicts a conversation between a father and his son. These two will talk about a dream that the little boy had.

The Lily

‘The Lily’ by William Blake uses personification and figurative meaning to describe several concepts of “love”—one being romantic and passionate, another being loyal and submissive, and the final being pure and strong.

The Little Black Boy

‘The Little Black Boy’ by William Blake is a difficult poem. It delves into topics of race, racism, and slavery from the perspective of an 18th-century poet.

To the Evening Star

‘To the Evening Star’ is written by one of the famous poets of the Romantic Age, William Blake. Like his other poems, here Blake presents the conflict between innocence and experience.

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