William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is considered to be one of, if not the, most important English-language writers of all time. His plays and poems are read all over the world. Read more about William Shakespeare.

Some of Shakespeare’s most famous sonnets include Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?, Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true mindsand Sonnet 130: My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.

10 of Shakespeare’s Best Love Sonnets

The 10 poems on this list represent some of the best love sonnets that Shakespeare wrote. They are in honor of the Fair Youth, an unknown, beautiful young man.

All the world’s a stage

‘All the world’s a stage’ is a well-known monologue found in William Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’. This speech of Jaques explores the seven ages of man and their implications.

Double, Double Toil and Trouble from Macbeth

‘Double, Double Toil and Trouble’ appears in the tragedy of ‘Macbeth’ by William Shakespeare. It is one of the “Song of the Witches” that appears in Act 4, Scene 1 of the play.

Sonnet 1

Shakespeare’s first sonnet, ‘From fairest creatures we desire increase,’ serves to introduce many of the themes which echo through the rest of the collection.

Sonnet 10

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10, also known as ‘For shame deny that thou bear’st love to any’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 100

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 100, ‘Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget’st so long,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 101

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 101, ‘O truant Muse what shall be thy amends,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 102

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 102, ‘My love is strengthen’d, though more weak in seeming,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 103

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 103, ‘Alack! what poverty my Muse brings forth,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 104

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 104, ‘To me, fair friend, you never can be old,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 105

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 105, ‘Let not my love be called idolatry,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 106

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 106, ‘When in the chronicle of wasted time,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 107

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 107, ‘Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 108

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 108, ‘What’s in the brain that ink may character,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 109

‘Sonnet 109,’ also known as ‘O! never say that I was false of heart,’ is an expression of pure love and devotion unchanged by time and circumstance. 

Sonnet 11

Read Sonnet 11, also known as ‘As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow’st,’ with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 110

‘Sonnet 110,’ also known as ‘Alas, ’tis true I have gone here and there,’ is a poem about infidelity and the speaker’s realization that the Fair Youth is the only one he wants. 

Sonnet 111

‘Sonnet 111,’ also known as ‘O, for my sake do you with fortune chide,’ is an interesting poem. In it, Shakespeare’s speaker describes the life Fortune has given him.

Sonnet 112

‘Sonnet 112,’ also known as ‘Your love and pity doth th’ impression fill,’ emphasizes the speaker’s obsession with the Fair Youth. He spends the lines reminding the Youth of how important his opinion is. 

Sonnet 113

‘Sonnet 113,’ also known as ‘Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind,’ is a demonstration of Shakespeare’s speaker’s love for the Fair Youth. He sees him in every animal, plant, and landscape he encounters. 

Sonnet 114

‘Sonnet 114,’ also known as ‘Or whether doth my mind, being crowned with you,’ is a poem about how one speaker interprets the world. Everything he sees and experiences is filtered through images of the person he loves.

Sonnet 115

‘Sonnet 115,’ also known as ‘Those lines that I before have writ do lie,’ is a poem about the ever-maturing nature of the speaker’s love for the Fair Youth. 

Sonnet 116

Sonnet 116: ‘Let me not to the marriage of true minds’ by William Shakespeare is easily one of the most recognizable sonnets of all time. It explores the nature of love and what “true love” is.

Sonnet 117

‘Sonnet 117,’ also known as ‘Accuse me thus: that I have scanted all,’ is a poem that delves into the complexities of relationships. The poet’s speaker emphasizes everything he’s done wrong and makes use his beloved understands them all.

Sonnet 118

‘Sonnet 118,’ also known as ‘Like as, to make our appetites more keen,’ by William Shakespeare uses metaphors to depict the current state of the speaker and Fair Youth’s relationship.

Sonnet 119

‘Sonnet 119,’ also known as ‘What potions have I drunk of siren tears,’ is a complicated poem in which the speaker describes a relationship he had with a woman. He admits it was a mistake.

Sonnet 12

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 12, also known as ‘When I do count the clocks that tell the time,’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 120

‘Sonnet 120,’ also known as ‘That you were once unkind befriends me now,’ is one of several sonnets the speaker spends apologizing for his infidelity. He hopes their sins will cancel one another out. 

Sonnet 121

‘Sonnet 121,’ also known as ‘‘Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed,’ is a poem about corruption and honesty. The speaker declares his intolerance of hypocrites who try to judge him. 

Sonnet 122

‘Sonnet 122,’ also known as ‘Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain,’ explores the speaker’s rejection of a simple gift he received from the Youth. He explains it away through a return to his regular devoted attitude. 

Sonnet 123

‘Sonnet 123,’ also known as ‘No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change,’ is a poem about time and change. The speaker asserts that time isn’t going to change him as it does others. 

Sonnet 124

‘Sonnet 124,’ also known as ‘If my dear love were but the child of state,’ is a poem about the speaker’s superior love. It has withstood a great deal and will last the test of time. 

Sonnet 125

‘Sonnet 125,’ also known as ‘Were’t ought to me I bore the canopy,’ is an expression of the speaker’s love for the Fair Youth. He declares the type of love he’s prepared to give and what he wants in return.

Sonnet 126

‘Sonnet 126,’ also known as ‘O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy pow’r,’ is the final Fair Youth sonnet. It is a beautiful exploration of time and the inevitability of death.

Sonnet 127

‘Sonnet 127,’ also known as ‘In the old age black was not counted fair,’ explores changing opinions on beauty and the use of makeup in Shakespeare’s contemporary world.

Sonnet 128

‘Sonnet 128,’ also known as ‘How oft when thou, my music, music play’st,’ is a sensuous poem. In it, the speaker describes the way his mistress plays the harpsichord and how he longs to touch her.

Sonnet 129

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 129, ‘Th’ expense of spirit in a waste of shame,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 13

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 13, also known as ‘O! That you were yourself; but, love, you are,’ with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 130

When contemporary poets chose to glorify their loved ones by using hyperbolic expressions, Shakespeare preferred an unflattering and realistic tone in his ‘Sonnet 130’. The speaker of this sonnet ignores all the elevating epithets and stays in solace with his beloved as she is.

Sonnet 131

‘Sonnet 131,’ also known as ‘Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art,’ is a poem about how the Dark Lady’s beauty moves the speaker. He knows she’s untraditionally beautiful but he doesn’t care.

Sonnet 132

‘Sonnet 132,’ also known as ‘Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me,’ describes the impact the Dark Lady’s eyes have on the speaker. She controls him and he has to accept that.

Sonnet 133

‘Sonnet 133,’ also known as ‘Beshrew that heart that makes my heart to groan,’ is a poem about the speaker’s toxic relationship with the Dark Lady. He tries to find a way to improve his circumstances but admits he’s trapped.

Sonnet 134

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 134, ‘So now I have confessed that he is thine,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 135

‘Sonnet 135,’ also known as ‘Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will,’ is an unusual sonnet within Shakespeare’s oeuvre. It expresses the speaker’s desire to sleep with the Dark Lady and counted among her many lovers.

Sonnet 136

‘Sonnet 136,’ also known as ‘If thy soul check thee that I come so near,’ is one of the “Will” sonnets. It describes the speaker’s lust for the Dark Lady.

Sonnet 137

‘Sonnet 137,’ also known as ‘Thou blind fool, Love, what dost thou to mine eyes,’ is about the speaker’s love for the Dark Lady. It condemns love for misleading the speaker about her.

Sonnet 138

‘Sonnet 138,’ also known as ‘When my love swears that she is made of truth,’ is a poem about the lies at the heart of a relationship. It depicts the necessity of two lovers misleading one another. 

Sonnet 139

‘Sonnet 139,’ also known as ‘O, call not me to justify the wrong,’ expresses the speaker’s longing that the Dark Lady stop treating him so cruelly. By the end, he gives in and accepts his fate. 

Sonnet 14

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 14, ‘Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 140

‘Sonnet 140,’ also known as ‘Be wise as thou art cruel; do not press,’ contains the speaker’s threats towards the Dark Lady. He says he will expose her affairs and flirtatious behavior if she doesn’t change her ways.

Sonnet 141

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 141, ‘In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 142

‘Sonnet 142,’ also known as ‘Love is my sin, and thy dear virtue hate,’ is one of the sonnets Shakespeare wrote about the Dark Lady. It compares love and sin.

Sonnet 143

‘Sonnet 143,’ also known as ‘Lo, as a careful housewife runs to catch,’ uses a simile to depict the speaker’s feelings for the Dark Lady. He is described as a crying infant desperate for his mother’s return.

Sonnet 144

‘Sonnet 144,’ also known as ‘Two loves I have of comfort and despair,’ expresses the speaker’s fears in regard to the Fair Youth’s purity. The poem is concerned with how he may be corrupted by the Dark Lady.

Sonnet 145

‘Sonnet 145,’ also known as ‘Those lips that Love’s own hand did make,’ details a woman’s changing regard for the speaker. It’s a simple poem with good examples of figurative language.

Sonnet 146

‘Sonnet 146,’ also known as ‘Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth,’ addresses the state of the speaker’s soul. He admonishes it for allowing him to worry about earthly pleasures.

Sonnet 147

‘Sonnet 147,’ also known as ‘My love is as a fever, longing still,’ is a dark poem. It expresses the speaker’s loss of control over his body and mind. The Dark Lady has consumed his life like an illness.

Sonnet 148

‘Sonnet 148,’ also known as ‘O me! What eyes hath Love put in my head,’ uses figurative language to describe the speaker’s state of mind. He’s blinded to his mistress’s faults, just like the sun becomes blinded by rain and clouds.

Sonnet 149

‘Sonnet 149,’ also known as ‘Canst thou, O cruel! say I love thee not,’ is about the speaker’s love and lust for the Dark Lady. His interest in her has evolved into an obsession that controls his life.

Sonnet 15

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 15, ‘When I consider every thing that grows,’ along with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 150

‘Sonnet 150,’ also known as ‘O! from what power hast thou this powerful might,’ explores the ways the Dark Lady controls Shakespeare’s speaker. She makes him love her even though she’s cruel to him

Sonnet 151

‘Sonnet 151,’ also known as ‘Love is too young to know what conscience is,’ is a lustful poem. It explores the speaker’s uncontrollable longing for the Dark Lady. 

Sonnet 152

‘Sonnet 152,’ also known as ‘In loving thee thou know’st I am forsworn,’ addresses the state of the speaker’s relationship with the Dark Lady. He seems to be willing to address that there’s no future for them.

Sonnet 153

‘Sonnet 153,’ also known as ‘Cupid laid by his brand and fell asleep,’ describes the speaker’s attempts to cure his lovesickness. He eventually fails and returns to the Dark Lady.

Sonnet 154

‘Sonnet 154,’ also known as ‘The little Love-god lying once asleep,’ describes how impossible it is for the speaker to rid himself of his love. There’s nothing he can do to stop loving the Dark Lady.

Sonnet 16

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 16, ‘But wherefore do not you a mightier way,’ along with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 17

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 17, ‘Who will believe my verse in time to come,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 18

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18, ‘Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 19

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 19, ‘Devouring Time, blunt thou the lion’s paws,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 2

Shakespeare’s second sonnet, ‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow,’ is the first sonnet that addresses the unknown ‘Fair Youth.’ 

Sonnet 20

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 20, ‘A woman’s face, with nature’s own hand painted,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 21

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 21, ‘So is it not with me as with that muse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 22

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 22, ‘My glass shall not persuade me I am old,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 23

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 23, ‘As an unperfect actor on the stage,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 24

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 24, ‘Mine eye hath play’d the painter and hath stell’d,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 25

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 25, ‘Let those who are in favour with their stars,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 26

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 26, ‘Lord of my love, to whom in vassalage,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 27

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 27, ‘Weary with toil, I haste me to my bed,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 28

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 28, ‘How can I then return in happy plight,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 29

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 29, ‘When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 3

‘Sonnet 3: Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest’ is a procreation sonnet within the fair youth sequence, a series of poems that are addressed to an unknown young man.

Sonnet 30

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 30, ‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 31

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 31, ‘Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 32

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 32, ‘If thou survive my well-contented day,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 33

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 33, ‘Full many a glorious morning have I seen,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 34

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 34, ‘Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 35

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 35, ‘No more be griev’d at that which thou hast done,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 36

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 36, ‘Let me confess that we two must be twain,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 37

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 37, ‘As a decrepit father takes delight,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 38

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 38, ‘How can my muse want subject to invent,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 39

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 39, ‘O how thy worth with manners may I sing,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 4

‘Unthrifty loveliness, why dost thou spend’ is Sonnet 4 in a series of 154 total sonnets that Shakespeare penned over his lifetime.

Sonnet 40

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 40, ‘Take all my loves, my love; yea, take them all,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 41

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 41, ‘Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 42

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 42, ‘That thou hast her it is not all my grief,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 43

‘Sonnet 43,’ also known as ’When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see,’ uses images of day and night. It depicts the speaker’s love for the Fair Youth.

Sonnet 44

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 44, ‘If the dull substance of my flesh were thought,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 45

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 45, ‘The other two, slight air and purging fire,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 46

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 46, ‘Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 47

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 47, ‘Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 48

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 48, ‘How careful was I, when I took my way,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 49

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 49, ‘Against that time, if ever that time come,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 5

Sonnet 5: ‘Those hours, that with gentle work did frame’ is part of the 154 sonnet collection that William Shakespeare wrote, published in a 1609 quarto.

Sonnet 50

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 50, ‘How heavy do I journey on the way,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 51

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 51, ‘Thus can my love excuse the slow offense,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 52

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 52, ‘So am I as the rich whose blessèd key,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 53

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 53, ‘What is your substance, whereof are you made,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 54

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 54, ‘O how much more doth beauty beauteous seem,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 55

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 55, ‘Not marble, nor the gilded monuments,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 56

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 56, ‘O how much more doth beauty beauteous seem,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 57

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 57, ‘Being your slave what should I do but tend,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 58

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 58, ‘That god forbid, that made me first your slave,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 59

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 59, ‘If there be nothing new, but that which is,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 6

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 6, also known as ‘Then let not winter’s ragged hand deface’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 60

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 60, ‘Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 61

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 61, ‘Is it thy will thy image should keep open,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 62

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 62, ‘Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 63

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 63, ‘Against my love shall be as I am now,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 64

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 64, ‘When I have seen by time’s fell hand defaced,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 65

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 65, ‘Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 66

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 66, ‘Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 67

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 67, ‘Ah, wherefore with infection should he live,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 68

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 68, ‘Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 69

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 69, ‘Those parts of thee that the world’s eye doth view,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 7

‘Lo! in the orient when the gracious light’ is Sonnet 7 of the one hundred and fifty-four sonnets that Shakespeare penned and belongs to the Fair Youth sequence.

Sonnet 70

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 70, ‘That thou art blamed shall not be thy defect,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 71

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 71, ‘No longer mourn for me when I am dead,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 72

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 72, ‘O lest the world should task you to recite,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 73

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73, ‘That time of year thou mayst in me behold,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 74

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 74, ‘But be contended: when that fell arrest,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 75

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 75, ‘So are you to my thoughts as food to life,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 76

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 76, ‘Why is my verse so barren of new pride,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 77

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 77, ‘Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 78

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 78, ‘So oft have I invoked thee for my muse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 79

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 79, ‘Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 8

‘Music to hear, why hear’st thou music sadly?’ is Sonnet 8 in the series of 154 sonnets that Shakespeare wrote during his lifetime. It belongs to the Fair Youth sequence.

Sonnet 80

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 80, ‘O how I faint when I of you do write,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 81

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 81, ‘Or I shall live, your epitaph to make,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 82

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 82, ‘I grant thou wert not married to my Muse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 83

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 83, ‘I never saw that you did painting need,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 84

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 84, ‘Who is it that says most, which can say more,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 85

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 85, ‘My tongue-tied muse in manners holds her still,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 86

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 86, ‘Was it the proud full sail of his great verse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 87

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 87, ‘Farewell, thou art too dear for my possessing,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 88

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 88, ‘When thou shalt be disposed to set me light,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 89

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 89, ‘Say that thou didst forsake me for some fault,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 9

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 9, also known as ‘Is it for fear to wet a widow’s eye’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 90

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 90, ‘Then hate me when thou wilt, if ever, now,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 91

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 91, ‘Some glory in their birth, some in their skill,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 92

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 92, ‘But do thy worst to steal thyself away,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 93

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 93, ‘So shall I live, supposing thou art true,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 94

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 94, ‘They that have pow’r to hurt,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 95

‘Sonnet 95,’ also known as ‘How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame,’ is number ninety-five of one hundred fifty-four sonnets that William Shakespeare wrote.

Sonnet 96

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 96, ‘Some say thy fault is youth, some wantonness,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 97

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 97, ‘How like a winter hath my absence been,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 98

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 98, ‘From you have I been absent in the spring,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 99

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 99, ‘The forward violet thus did I chide,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

The quality of mercy is not strained

“The quality of mercy is not strained” is one of the greatest monologues written by William Shakespeare. Portia delivers this monologue to Shylock in Act IV, Scene I of “The Merchant of Venice.”

To be, or not to be from Hamlet

“To be, or not to be,” the opening line of Hamlet’s mindful soliloquy, is one of the most thought-provoking quotes of all time. The monologue features the important theme of existential crisis.

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