William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is considered to be one of, if not the, most important English-language writers of all time. His plays and poems are read all over the world. Read more about William Shakespeare.

Some of Shakespeare’s most famous sonnets include Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?, Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true mindsand Sonnet 130:  My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.

10 of Shakespeare’s Best Love Sonnets

The 10 poems on this list represent some of the best love sonnets that Shakespeare wrote. They are in honor of the Fair Youth, an unknown, beautiful young man.

A Fairy Song

‘A Fairy Song’ by William Shakespeare features in the well-loved play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It’s sung by a fairy and describes their work.

a fairy song by william shakespeare

All the world’s a stage

‘All the world’s a stage’ is a well-known monologue found in William Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’. This speech of Jaques explores the seven ages of man and their implications.

All the world’s a stage by William Shakespeare Visual Representation

Double, Double Toil and Trouble from Macbeth

‘Double, Double Toil and Trouble’ appears in the tragedy of ‘Macbeth’ by William Shakespeare. It is one of the “Song of the Witches” that appears in Act 4, Scene 1 of the play.

Friends and Flatterers

‘Friends and Flatterers’ by William Shakespeare is a powerful poem about friendship and how to spot those who are true and false. 

Friends and Flatterers by William Shakespeare Visual Representation

Once More Unto The Breach (Henry V)

From Henry V, ‘Once More Unto The Breach,’ without doubt, one of Shakespeare’s most rousing and iconic speeches. It has inspired motivational speeches from everywhere from Independence Day and Star Trek and remains a masterclass in rhetoric language to this day.

Once More Unto The Breach by William Shakespeare Visual Representation

Our revels now are ended

‘Our revels now are ended’ is the name given to one of the best-known speeches from William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. It can be found in Act IV, Scene 1, and is spoken by Prospero. 

Our revels now are ended by William Shakespeare Visual Representation

Sonnet 1

Shakespeare’s first sonnet, ‘From fairest creatures we desire increase,’ serves to introduce many of the themes which echo through the rest of the collection.

Sonnet 10

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 10, also known as ‘For shame deny that thou bear’st love to any’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 100

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 100, ‘Where art thou, Muse, that thou forget’st so long,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 101

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 101, ‘O truant Muse what shall be thy amends,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 102

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 102, ‘My love is strengthen’d, though more weak in seeming,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 103

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 103, ‘Alack! what poverty my Muse brings forth,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 104

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 104, ‘To me, fair friend, you never can be old,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 105

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 105, ‘Let not my love be called idolatry,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 106

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 106, ‘When in the chronicle of wasted time,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 107

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 107, ‘Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 108

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 108, ‘What’s in the brain that ink may character,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 109

‘Sonnet 109,’ also known as ‘O! never say that I was false of heart,’ is an expression of pure love and devotion unchanged by time and circumstance. 

Sonnet 11

Read Sonnet 11, also known as ‘As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow’st,’ with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 110

‘Sonnet 110,’ also known as ‘Alas, ’tis true I have gone here and there,’ is a poem about infidelity and the speaker’s realization that the Fair Youth is the only one he wants. 

Sonnet 111

‘Sonnet 111,’ also known as ‘O, for my sake do you with fortune chide,’ is an interesting poem. In it, Shakespeare’s speaker describes the life Fortune has given him.