William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is considered to be one of, if not the, most important English-language writers of all time. His plays and poems are read all over the world. Read more about William Shakespeare.

Some of Shakespeare’s most famous sonnets include Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?, Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true mindsand Sonnet 130:  My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.

Sonnet 82

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 82, ‘I grant thou wert not married to my Muse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 83

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 83, ‘I never saw that you did painting need,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 84

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 84, ‘Who is it that says most, which can say more,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 85

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 85, ‘My tongue-tied muse in manners holds her still,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 86

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 86, ‘Was it the proud full sail of his great verse,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 87

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 87, ‘Farewell, thou art too dear for my possessing,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 88

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 88, ‘When thou shalt be disposed to set me light,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 89

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 89, ‘Say that thou didst forsake me for some fault,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 9

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 9, also known as ‘Is it for fear to wet a widow’s eye’, with a deep dive analysis into the poem.

Sonnet 90

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 90, ‘Then hate me when thou wilt, if ever, now,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 91

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 91, ‘Some glory in their birth, some in their skill,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 92

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 92, ‘But do thy worst to steal thyself away,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 93

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 93, ‘So shall I live, supposing thou art true,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 94

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 94, ‘They that have pow’r to hurt,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 95

‘Sonnet 95,’ also known as ‘How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame,’ is number ninety-five of one hundred fifty-four sonnets that William Shakespeare wrote.

Sonnet 96

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 96, ‘Some say thy fault is youth, some wantonness,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 97

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 97, ‘How like a winter hath my absence been,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 98

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 98, ‘From you have I been absent in the spring,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

Sonnet 99

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 99, ‘The forward violet thus did I chide,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

The quality of mercy is not strained

“The quality of mercy is not strained” is one of the greatest monologues written by William Shakespeare. Portia delivers this monologue to Shylock in Act IV, Scene I of “The Merchant of Venice.”

The quality of mercy is not strained

To be, or not to be from Hamlet

“To be, or not to be,” the opening line of Hamlet’s mindful soliloquy, is one of the most thought-provoking quotes of all time. The monologue features the important theme of existential crisis.

To be, or not to be from Hamlet

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