Birds

Poems about birds are incredibly popular in the history of verse writing. They explore birds’ qualities and their symbolic power.

Some bird poems are solely dedicated to exploring the animals, their behavior, appearance, habitat, songs, and more. These poems often praise the natural world and are written to inspire the reader to spend more time analyzing the world around them. Bird poems are often written in order to prompt readers to get outside more and love nature’s incredible inhabitants.

In other bird poems, in fact, the majority of them use birds as symbols. Authors like Emily Dickinson and Gerard Manley Hopkins are well-known for poems that do just this. They are usually depicted as symbols of hope, God, faith, change, travel, light, and peace. More often than not, they are represented positively.

I have a Bird in spring

‘I have a Bird in spring’ by Emily Dickinson is dedicated to a close friendship poet was concerned about losing. It uses an extended metaphor created through zoomorphism. 

Crow Sickened by Ted Hughes

‘Crow Sickened’ is a brilliant example of Hughes’ playful style, in which Crow attempts to work out the cause of his misery.

Something Told the Wild Geese by Rachel Field

‘Something Told the Wild Geese’ by Rachel Field discusses geese, and other animals, reactions to signs of winter. The poem takes place in summer and warns against being unprepared and dwelling on unhappiness. 

Blackberrying by Sylvia Plath

‘Blackberrying’ by Sylvia Plath explores decaying and flourishing life and human mortality. It was published in 1971 in Crossing the Water, after the poet’s death.

Australia 1970 by Judith Wright

‘Australia 1970’ by Judith Wright speaks on the changing landscape of Australia in the 1970s. It promotes a version of Australia that is fierce, wild, and dangerous just like the animals that have always lived within its boundaries.

A Murmur in the Trees— to note

‘A Murmur in the Trees— to note’ by Emily Dickinson is a poem about nature’s magic. It includes mysterious images of fairy men, glowing lights in the woods, and the murmuring of trees. 

The Writer by Richard Wilbur

‘The Writer’ by Richard Wilbur depicts a father watching his daughter create her first piece of writing. The poet uses clever and creative examples of figurative language in order to depict the struggle new and experienced writers go through. 

The Harvest Moon by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

‘The Harvest Moon’ by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow describes the way that the light of the harvest moon touches everything. It is an indication that fall is here and that winter is on its way. 

One For Sorrow

‘One For Sorrow’ it’s an old English nursery rhyme that playfully interprets magpies (a type of bird) as signs of the future. 

Love on the Farm by D.H. Lawrence

‘Love on the Farm’ by D.H. Lawrence is a poem about the universality of love, passion, and death. Lawrence depicts these elements through the various lives observable on a farm.

Swan in Falling Snow by Denise Levertov

Denise Levertov’s poem ‘Swan in Falling Snow’ is about a speaker’s discovery of a swan’s frozen body. His sad feeling for the creature is portrayed in this poem.

Crows in a Strong Wind by Cornelius Eady

‘Crows in a Strong Wind’ appears in the American poet Cornelius Eady’s poetry collection Victims of Latest Dance Craze. This piece captures the crows’ directionless movement in the stormy wind.

Madonna Mia by Oscar Wilde

‘Madonna Mia’ by Oscar Wilde is a beautiful and interesting poem. In it, the speaker describes a “lily-girl.” 

The North Wind Doth Blow

‘The North Wind Doth Blow,’ also sometimes known as ‘The Robin,’ is a short English nursery rhyme that may date as far back as 16th century England.

Eagle Poem by Joy Harjo

Have you ever wondered how graciously an eagle floats in the sky by making circular movements? In ‘Eagle Poem,’ Joy Harjo depicts how it is similar to the cycle of life.

Sonnet 102 by William Shakespeare

Read Shakespeare’s Sonnet 102, ‘My love is strengthen’d, though more weak in seeming,’ with a summary and complete analysis of the poem.

A Route of Evanescence

‘A Route of Evanescence’ by Emily Dickinson describes its subject through a series of metaphors, allusions, and images. But, never actually states that the subject is a hummingbird.

A drop fell on the apple tree

‘A drop fell on the apple tree’ by Emily Dickinson is filled with joy. It describes, with Dickinson’s classic skill, images of the summer season and how a storm can influence it.

I dreaded that first Robin

’I dreaded that first Robin’ by Emily Dickinson is a surprising poem about nature. The speaker confesses to an unusual opinion about the season throughout the lines.

Wild Swans by Edna St. Vincent Millay

‘Wild Swans’ by Edna St. Vincent Millay tells of a speaker’s desperation to get out of her current physical and emotional space and find a bird-like freedom. 

Orinda to Lucasia by Katherine Philips

‘Orinda to Lucasia’ by Katherine Philips describes the importance and intensity of the relationship she holds with her close friend, Anne Owens. 

Of Mere Being by Wallace Stevens

‘Of Mere Being’ by Wallace Stevens describes the world beyond one’s last thought and speaks to the elemental purity of existence. 

A Bird, came down the Walk

‘A Bird, came down the Walk’ by Emily Dickinson is a beautiful nature poem. It focuses on the actions of a bird going about its everyday life.

Hadedah by Adam Schwartzman

‘Hadedah’ by Adam Schwartzman is an original poem in which the speaker uses animal imagery, specifically that of an ibis, to talk about complex subjects like the South African political climate.

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